Tennis Rules



T
ennis is a racket game which is played between two competitors each utilizing a special tennis racket strung with flexible string or with braided steel wire to hit an object ball onto a specially marked up or round green tennis court and then into the other opponent's court for points. Each player also uses a specially strung tennis racket with braided steel wire or with hollow rubber ball to hit the object ball onto the specially marked up or round green tennis court and then into the other opponent's court for points. The object ball is usually covered with felt or with fur over it. The game of tennis is played in a ground-court arrangement and players have to alternate starting positions, the first player on the baseline playing the offensive ball and the other player on the defensive line. The match results if the player hitting the ball at any point hits the opponent's ball and returns it to the tennis court; and if the player hitting the ball makes an error and the opponent returns the ball to the tennis court, the player who made the error is declared the loser of the match.

In singles and doubles games, the winner is the player with the highest score in the final standings. There are three types of points in a tennis match; match point, win point, and match finish. Match point refers to the total number of wins a player has, half-match point if he has lost half of his previous matches, and full match point if he has won half of his previous matches. Win point is the number of wins a player has to reach the championship, half-match point if he has lost half of his previous matches, and full match point if he has won half of his previous matches. In doubles play, the winning player together with the person second highest and the one-third highest in the overall standings wins.

Each individual match in a tennis match has seven points, and a tiebreak is the sole deciding factor for a player to advance to the final set. In a grand slam tennis match, no ties can exist. In a six-player grand slam tournament, ties will be allowed. However, when there are more than six players in a tournament, ties will not be allowed and the last set of matches will determine the winner.

The first set is always a tiebreak game. A player advances to the second round by first serving twice from the place that he is served the first time. The second serve must be a foot fault. The two points are separated by a boundary, either inside or outside the court whichever is closer. The server is not allowed to return the ball over the net to his opponents, and the opponents are not allowed to serve again over the net to their opponents once they have served it. The two points are then awarded to the player with the most points.

A lot of tennis rules are the same for singles matches and doubles matches. They are also usually very similar. Many times a match can even be played on an outdoor court, provided that it meets certain tennis rules.

Serving is generally dealt with using the same protocol as in singles play. After a player has been served, he must collect himself before returning the ball to the net. This process, known as footwork, is an important part of the tennis rules.

In general, tennis players serve to their opponents' feet. In a point-of-aid, if a player serves a volley to his opponent's ball, this counts as one point. However, if a player returns the ball to the other player's foot, this counts as two points. In doubles play, the point-of-aid is different. In doubles, the player who first receives the ball first is declared the winner.

Tennis rules list a lot of specifics, such as how many faulting strokes a player may have. A foul-stroke is a stroke that results in a fault. There are two foul strokes in a set: the service and the return. Each team has twenty seconds to serve at the end of the net session. The tennis rules also tell the judge whether the fault was with the foot or the forehand side of the court, or whether the stroke was made against the inside or outside perimeter of the court.

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